Behind the barn doors

The minute we posted a video and pictures of lambs Bongo and Halle, our newest arrivals, we knew people would be fawning over them. They're simply adorable.

They had been with us almost 2 weeks before we unleashed their cuteness on the world. They had a tough go....and we're still a little cautiously optimistic with their health but their story gives you a look behind the barn doors of what often goes into saving the youngest rescues.

Bongo and Halle didn't arrive as the happy, energetic lambs they are now. They were found by workers at a local slaughterhouse in a trailer that had been unloaded of sheep for slaughter the day before. The odds were stacked against them from the get go. Less than 24 hours old, born in a dirty trailer packed with sheep, it was unlikely they got to nurse off their mom so chances are they didn't receive any colostrum. Colostrum is essential for newborns in their first few hours, without it, they lack needed antibodies. The survival rate of lambs and goat kids is slim without colostrum and we missed the window to give them any sort of supplement. This is often the case for little ones born at the slaughterhouse.

Over the next week it was touch and go treating a variety of ailments. Tube feeding fluids, bottles off and on depending on what their systems could handle and when they would take them. Medications to help their immune systems fight against anything they were exposed to in that trailer. A lot of sleepless nights for Barbara. Barbara has a full time corporate job and has just a handful of regular volunteers, there is no staff. So when these sick lambs and kids come into the rescue, it is Barbara who creates an ICU for them in her home. It involves a lot of work, a lot of worry and waiting. Waiting to see if all of these efforts will be successful and they'll turn the corner.

Turn the corner they did.

Now, they're starting to play, starting to nibble on grass and are the best tail wagers you've ever seen. Unlike goats who often park their kids to go off and graze, lambs are always with their moms. These little lambs follow 2 legs instead of 4. You can't go anywhere on the farm without them being under your feet and just try going through a gate and leaving them on the other side. It's near impossible.

 Halle meets Piper. Piper is ready to play, as always

Halle meets Piper. Piper is ready to play, as always

 It's all about "where's the milk?"

It's all about "where's the milk?"

Saving the littlest slaughterhouse rescues is not easy, the conditions are often more than they can overcome. Every once in awhile though our efforts triumph and we get to experience the joy that these babies bring....welcome to the rescue Bongo and Halle. You already have a fan club!